Home-based and small business aquaculture

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby enigma » Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:16 am


A question on splitting nems.

Have you ever used rubber bands to get them to finish the split on their own? My thought is that it may be healthier on them if they split on their own with a little help.

Thanks
Craig


I have had much better luck with treating my Anemonies like ex's just cut it clean. The healing is much faster. :lol:
With reasonable men, I will reason; with humane men I will plead; but to tyrants I will give no quarter, nor waste arguments where they will certainly be lost. --William Lloyd Garrison--
User avatar
enigma
 
Posts: 1070
Joined: Fri Mar 20, 2009 9:26 pm

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:13 pm

Lance... thanks for the offer, my friend. Steve and I are just getting our bearings with revamping the greenhouse. We have about 10,000 liters of culture water operational which has been easy to handle. But the long term goal is to have another 20,000 liters producing. We may need help then ;) For now though we are just poor and happy working in the sun :D

Craig: regarding splitting the anemones with bands or any means of constriction, its actually a more dangerous and less productive manner. Much like using constrictive techniques on heavily mucous corals (such as green fingers, yellow leathers, colt corals... even corallimorphs). While most other soft corals respond well to "pinching off" for those that want to be conservative in technique, the heavily mucous corals and anemones suffer as the bands dont cut quick enough but rather serve to irritate and stimulate more mucous production. The more mucous produced... the more bacteria flourish. And that's when things can get ugly (much like the bacterial infections in shipping bags of corals from all of the mucous produced).

Dont be shy my friend... cut any well conditioned anemone in half with a long clean blade. You can watch them cinch closed right before your eyes... attach to a substrate within minutes and be fully healed in less than 2 weeks.

Phyto - thank you for the kind word about my book :)

Peter - yes, my flight home was much more merciful :D I am delighted to see you and look forward to your contributions and our chats, my friend.

Kind regards to all, Anthony
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:13 pm

Mark... that's hilarious. Sad but true :)
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Spracklcat » Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:26 pm

Can someone split the anemone discussion into the Asexual Propagation forum? That would be helpful for people looking for that information. Please and thank you :)
User avatar
Spracklcat
 
Posts: 590
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2007 5:12 pm
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Luis A M » Wed Jul 15, 2009 4:05 pm

enigma wrote:

I have had much better luck with treating my Anemonies like ex's just cut it clean. The healing is much faster. :lol:

Meaning really what I think? :oops: :twisted:
I could never keep any of them alive for long,perhaps a thread of current state of the art anemone keeping protocol could be helpful...
Luis
User avatar
Luis A M
Moderator
 
Posts: 5630
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2007 2:34 pm
Location: Buenos Aires,Argentina

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Scottt » Fri Jul 17, 2009 1:21 am

Its funny this thread showed up; my garage began its slow transformation into a small hatchery earlier this month. I should probably start a separate thread about that though.
User avatar
Scottt
 
Posts: 790
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:14 pm
Location: Albany, NY

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby lance » Fri Jul 17, 2009 3:18 am

Anthony Calfo wrote:Lance... thanks for the offer, my friend. Steve and I are just getting our bearings with revamping the greenhouse. We have about 10,000 liters of culture water operational which has been easy to handle. But the long term goal is to have another 20,000 liters producing. We may need help then ;) For now though we are just poor and happy working in the sun :D



Thanks Anthony I hope the best for you too like I said and I'm here to help you guy's anyway I can maybe once thing's get rolling and you start crushing on sale's and turnover on product's. You'll expand and I can partner up with you two but if there is anything you need let me know.

lance
http://www.youtube.com/user/CoralMan24

http://s704.photobucket.com/albums/ww49/lancelesko/

Always quarantine new arrival's before adding to breeding tank's or display
lance
 
Posts: 431
Joined: Tue Jun 03, 2008 6:11 pm

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Scottt » Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:34 pm

I was thinking of adding a sizable refugium full of macro algae to my system for nutrient scrubbing. Water changes could be greatly reduced with a balanced fish:plant ratio. What species would you all recommend? (Chaetomorpha is the only one I know of honestly)
It would be neat to use edible kelp, anyone have any info on this?
User avatar
Scottt
 
Posts: 790
Joined: Sun Jun 21, 2009 7:14 pm
Location: Albany, NY

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby bigalulrich » Mon Jul 20, 2009 12:57 pm

I'm thinking of building a multi-tank rack--I found the following link--any advice from those of you who have done this already?
Any improvements to this build that you would make?
http://www.petfish.net/kb/entry/343/
bigalulrich
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 11:01 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby PaulG » Mon Jul 20, 2009 7:03 pm

Personally I'de ditch the cement blocks & just build it out of wood.
Also DON'T use parcticle board/mdf as stated in the article, stick with ply.

Here's what I did...

IMG_1648 (Small).JPG


IMG_1649 (Small).JPG


IMG_1650 (Small).JPG


Hope this give you some ideas, it can be made larger by making mutilpes or adding addition supports in teh middle of a wider span.

The above has had 6 tanks on it previously but I'm slowing moved them all out inot the fishroom.


HTH
PaulG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
User avatar
PaulG
 
Posts: 1127
Joined: Thu Oct 18, 2007 5:44 am

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby bigalulrich » Tue Jul 21, 2009 10:05 am

perfect. thanks.
bigalulrich
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Thu Jan 08, 2009 11:01 pm
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby KathyL » Tue Jul 21, 2009 1:30 pm

Well, I 've decided not to go with the garage as my new space, but I am still very interested in how one would go about preping one for such an operation.
The room I will be going with is in a vintage building with plaster walls and a tin ceiling. I asked the owner about insulation, and she said she didn't know. I assume that means there is none. I am planning to use a fresh air exchange system in addition to normal air conditioning and heating. Will I need to apply insulation over the walls and ceiling as well? (I have kept an inordinate number of tanks in my basement for a couple of years, and with the care that I take to keep things covered, I have no problems with humidity. Our house is well insulated at least in the ceiling, and I have a muffin fan exporting basement air 24/7. The house is leaky enough to accomodate this.
User avatar
KathyL
 
Posts: 3442
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 12:13 am
Location: Missouri, USA

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 8:35 pm

wow Kathy... the tin ceilings are a doozy :( Staggeringly poor insulation among other things. The plaster walls are no more or less of an issue than modern drywall. Yes, absorbent and a potential mold/mildew field... but if you seal them well (caulk all seams if you can actually... walls to ceiling) and give it a REALLY good quality coat of paint (again, as one would use in bathrooms or high moisture areas), the walls will be fine. I'm just worried about the ceiling... how bad it will breach humid air/lose energy and where that is going (what's above it?).
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:34 pm

Sorry for the hiatus... had a busy couple of weeks :)

Getting back to the topic, lets start with the walls and ceiling. The options vary of course and we will cover the exceptions with your posts and comments, but to begin somewhere lets discuss traditional structures of framed (wooden houses) or block walls with or without studding out and finishing (both to be addressed).

The recurring theme you will see in discussions about fishrooms over and over again is about controlling moisture. Moisture damage to the walls, damage to aquarium fixtures and electronics, rest of the house/building, serious mold/mildew problems, trapping heat excessively, etc.

You want to insure that your fishroom - whether that's simply a room in the home or a more formal space with drains such as a garage or outbuilding - is sealed up tight so that you can control how much moisture is allowed (moisture-holding heat can be great for a fishroom with a heat exchanging ductwork... but bad for a coral greenhouse that needs drier air for evaporative cooling).

Starting with bare walls is obviously easiest and the best scenario (see image below). But most folks likely will not have that luxury. Instead, investigate the nature of your walls (and its worth cutting a hole and then patching it to see). Are you working with just studs? Studs plus a vapor barrier? Studs with insulation? Studs with insulation and a vapor barrier (ideal). In some cases (commercial purpose, serious hobbyist, long term plans for the use of the room, etc) it may be worth stripping down the finishing work and start fairly fresh (paint/seal the raw walls and then studs... insulate properly and use a vapor barrier, then hang moisture resistant wall panels). Many things to ponder here. Lets dive in...
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby KathyL » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:50 pm

What's above it is unknown to me right now. The tin ceiling looks freshly painted. If I get the lease, I can check into what's on the other side of the tin, and see if I can either apply insulation right over the tin, with the thought that should I leave, they can simply remove the insulation. Alternatively, I can ask to completely remove the tin, insulate, vapor barier, and reinstall the tin, or simply save it for the next tenant. Hopefully, I'll be wildly successful, and they won't need another tenant for a long time....
User avatar
KathyL
 
Posts: 3442
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 12:13 am
Location: Missouri, USA

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:56 pm

Addressing the garage or like-building conversion for a fishroom, evaluate what are you working with. Short of the bliss of a new home construction, some repairs are likely going to be needed. Let me see if I can figure out this picture posting thingy :)

Pictured here is a rough garage. Some old cabinets pegged to the wall, unfinished but scrappy walls overall, cracks in the mortar joints (clear view of the outside through them!) and some mold and mildew spotting the walls (as it turns out... there was a LOT of mildew behind the cabinets which were torn out and disposed). Alot of work needs done here.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by Anthony Calfo on Wed Jul 29, 2009 10:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 9:58 pm

Kathy - It would be a shame to ruin the tin ceiling unless it is quite beyond saving. Collectors of architectural antiques pay dearly for such material and the cost of new tin ceiling panels (poorly made at that) is exorbitant! Do consider removing them and making at least a couple people happy :)
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:04 pm

After the walls were stripped down it didn't look any prettier:
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:05 pm

Solution steps: stain-killer/sealing paint ala "Kilz" (caution: VERY toxic to aquatic life and you... wear a respirator). This will prep the walls and any studs that may remain. The gist of it is that we don't want water coming through (if its below grade and your area gets at least occasional heavy rainfall) and we dont want moisture penetrating those walls (block or wood) and becoming a dangerous vector for mold/mildew.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:08 pm

Obvious stuff here, but caulk (buy the really good stuff - contractor's grade for great tensile strength and longevity)... the cracks, the floor seam, the vertical wall seams and the ceiling seams.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:11 pm

Certain features such as structural beams (horizontal or vertical, wood or steel as in the picture here - an I-beam) will require special attention indeed. Having your wall studs rot from moisture is one thing... but having structural beams weaken is just not funny. Seal these especially well with moisture resistant paint.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:18 pm

If your garage has a habitable room above it, it likely has ductwork for heating and cooling. This is a particularly scrappy example with deteriorating insulation around it. As per previous articles of need, the ductwork needs to be very well sealed to prevent wanted heat and unwanted moisture from escaping the fishroom.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:23 pm

Take old ductwork and wrap with new insulation, a vapor barrier (tape all seams!) and then box it in (caulking those seams and painting all with quality paint again.
Note: this picture shows the duct in an unfinished state so that you can see the vapor barrier covering the insulation in the unfinished bulkhead.
Also Note: check with your local building code authority regarding the lawful and safe way to insulate and enclose HVAC lines.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:28 pm

OK... now with the entire fishroom (simple room in home or more involved space such as a garage) totally caulked, sealed and painted, we can frame it out for hanging moisture resistant composite panels or well coated moisture boards (special drywall for bathrooms and the like). For space saving (especially like an already finished room in a house) you may want to use furring strips that are not much wider than 1/2" thick. Else standard 2X4's are typical and stronger.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

Re: Home-based and small business aquaculture

Postby Anthony Calfo » Wed Jul 29, 2009 11:31 pm

Be sure to insert cross bracing (above images) for cabinets or fixtures you intend to hang after the walls are finished. Also... its not a terrible idea to punch some PVC pipes through the wall to serve as conduits for running electricity or water into the fishroom.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Aquarium hobby and aquatic science author and publisher. Micro hatchery operator (marine fishes and invertebrates).
Consultant - contact at www.ReadingTrees.com
User avatar
Anthony Calfo
 
Posts: 266
Joined: Fri Oct 03, 2008 11:56 am
Location: Pennsylvania

PreviousNext

Return to Growout



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron