Ornamental Marinelife Laws & Restrictions in Hawaii?

Ornamental Marinelife Laws & Restrictions in Hawaii?

Postby mpedersen » Tue Apr 01, 2008 11:01 pm

So I'm curious, what are the restrictions on ornamental marine life (fish and corals) in Hawaii? I've heard and seen some conflicting things. I.e., I've heard you can only keep native Hawaiian fish, and only 3 types of "coral" are allowed, yet on the flipside we have folks like Ocean Rider and Reef Culture Technologies clearly culturing non-native species. I did a bit of digging on the Hawaiian Governmental Sites and didn't find anything specific, so now I'm asking in the hopes that someone already knows!

Matt
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Postby mpedersen » Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:04 am

So it looks like I found some info:

http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/adminrules/AR-71P.pdf

Of interest, here are all the marine ornamental fish that are prohibited:

Family Plotosidae (Eel Catfish)
http://www.wetwebmedia.com/plotosid.htm
Only Ornamental Species - Plotosus lineatus

ORDER Scorpaeniformes
FAMILY Scorpaenidae
Amblyapistus taenianotus
Dendrochirus zebra
Inimicus didactylum
Paracentropogon longispinis
Pterois sp.
(all species in genus)
Scorpaena (all species in genus)
Scorpaenodes (all species in scorpion fishes
genus)
Synanceia horrida
Synanceia verrucosa
Taenianotus triacanthus


There are some other marine species, but it seems that these are the only ones routinely kept in the "average" home aquarium (do we really consider Wobbegong Sharks as "marine ornamentals"???)

Well, just to be safe:

ORDER Orectolobiformes
FAMILY Orectolobidae
Orectolobus maculatus
Orectolobus ornatus

It is interesting to note that on the invert side, the lits of prohibited species/families is not what I expected:

CLASS Cephalopoda
ORDER Octopoda
FAMILY Octopobidae
Octopus maculosus
Octopus maya


PHYLUM Cnidaria
CLASS Cubozoa
ORDER Cubomedusae
FAMILY Chirodropidae
Chirodropidae (all species in jellyfishes
family)

I'm curious, I do not see ANY prohibition of live coral species. Oh, and perhaps the wierdest one...we use bloodworm as fishfood, right?!

PHYLUM Annelida
CLASS Polychaeta
ORDER Phyllodocida
FAMILY Glyceridae
Glycera americana

I guess this means that I CAN bring Mama & Little Man Onyx Percula to Hawaii to start my fish hatchery! ;)

Matt
Last edited by Anonymous on Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mpedersen » Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:19 am

There's actually some other lists, and I noticed that the "Restricted for personal use" list includes just about very shark species you may see a home hobbyist keep (I beleive this list just means special permits are required for importation into the state)

Animals on Part B of the list of restricted
animals, for the purposes described in
subsection (b)(2) herein or for private and
commercial use, including research,
zoological parks, or aquaculture
production


http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/adminrules/AR-71RB.pdf

Not going to bother to list out that list..nothing realy of interest.

I then looked at the "Restricted for Research / Exhibit" list, and was again surprised by some of what I found:

Animals on Part A of the list of restricted
animals, for research by universities or
government agencies, exhibition in
municipal zoos or government-affiliated
aquariums, for other institutions for
medical or scientific purposes as
determined by the board, or for other
purposes as specified in this chapter


http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/adminrules/AR-71RA.pdf

FAMILY Siganidae
Lo magnificus
Lo uspi
Lo vulpinus
Siganus corallinus
Siganus lineatus
Siganus puellus
Siganus vermiculatus
Siganus vermiculatus
Siganus virgatus


Ornamental Inverts too - it's a suddenly HUGE list:

CLASS Merostomata
ORDER Xiphosura
FAMILY Limulidae
Limulus polyphemus

PHYLUM Chordata
CLASS Ascidiacea
ORDER Aplousobranchia
FAMILY Didemnidae
Lissoclinum patellum

FAMILY Hippolytidae
Thor amoinessis
Thor paschalis


FAMILY Palaemonidae
Periclimenes brevicarpalis
Periclimenes longirostris
Periclimenes ornatus
Periclimenes paraornatus
Periclimenes tunipes


CLASS Crustacea
ORDER Decapoda
FAMILY Alpheidae
Athanas (all species in genus)

CLASS Scyphozoa
ORDER Rhizostomeae
Rhizostomeae (all species in order) jellyfish

ORDER Semaeostomeae
Semaeostomeae (all species in order) jellyfish

PHYLUM Echinodermata
CLASS Crinoidea
Crinoidea (all species in class) crinoid

CLASS Echinoidea
Echinoidea (all species in class) echinoderm


CLASS Cephalopoda
ORDER Nautilida
FAMILY Nautilidae
Nautilus belauensis
Nautilus pompilius


ORDER Sepioidea
FAMILY Sepiidae
Sepia (all species in genus) cuttlefish

ORDER Teuthoidea
FAMILY Loliginidae
Sepioteuthis lessoniana

CLASS Gastropoda
ORDER Anaspidea
FAMILY Aplysiidae
Aplysia californica

FAMILY Cypraeidae
Cypraeidae (all species cowry
in family)

FAMILY Strombidae
Lambis lambis
Strombus luhuanus

And then I stumbled upon the list of every known coral/polyp we keep in our REEF TANKS:

PHYLUM Cnidaria
CLASS Anthozoa

ORDER Actinaria
FAMILY Actiniidae
Actiniidae (all species in family) anemone, sea
FAMILY Stichodactylidae
Stichodactylidae (all species anemone, sea
in family)
FAMILY Thalassianthidae
Thalassianthidae (all species anemone, sea
in family)
ORDER Alcyonacea
FAMILY Acanthogorgiidae
Acanthogorgiidae (all species gorgonian
in family)
FAMILY Alcyoniidae
Alcyoniidae (all species in family, coral, leather
except Sarcophyton ehrenbergi,
S. glaucum, S. trocheliophorum)
FAMILY Asterospiculariidae
Asterospiculariidae (all species coral, leather
in family)
FAMILY Briareidae
Briareidae (all species in family) gorgonian
FAMILY Clavulariidae
Clavulariidae (all species polyp, star
in family)
FAMILY Cornulariidae
Cornulariidae (all species polyp, star
in family)
FAMILY Ellisellidae
Ellisellidae (all species in family) gorgonian
FAMILY Gorgoniidae
Gorgoniidae (all species in family) gorgonian
FAMILY Isidadae
Isidadae (all species in family) gorgonian
FAMILY Melithaeidae
Melithaeidae (all species in family) gorgonian
FAMILY Nephtheidae
Nephtheidae (all species in family) coral, tree
FAMILY Nidaliidae
Nidaliidae (all species in family) coral, tree
FAMILY Paralcyoniidae
Paralcyoniidae (all species coral, Christmas tree
in family)
FAMILY Subergordiidae
Subergordiidae (all species gorgonian
in family)
FAMILY Tubiporidae
Tubiporidae (all species in family) coral, red pipe organ
FAMILY Xeniidae
Xeniidae (all species in family) coral, pulse
ORDER Antipatharia
Antipatharia (all species in order) coral, black and whip
ORDER Ceriantharia
Ceriantharia (all species in order) anemone, tube

ORDER Corallimorpharia
FAMILY Discosomatidae
Discosomatidae (all species anemone, mushroom
in family)
FAMILY Ricordeidae
Ricordeidae (all species in family) anemone, mushroom

ORDER Helioporacea
FAMILY Helioporidae
Heliopora coerula coral, blue
ORDER Pennatulacea
Pennatulacea (all species in order) sea pen
ORDER Scleractinia
FAMILY Acroporidae
Acroporidae (all species in family, coral, staghorn
except Acropora aspersa,
A. austera, A. elseyi, A. formosa,
A. microphthalma, A. nana)
FAMILY Agariciidae
Agariciidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Astrocoeniidae
Astrocoeniidae (all species coral
in family)
FAMILY Caryophylliidae
Caryophylliidae (all species coral
in family)
FAMILY Dendrophylliidae
Dendrophylliidae (all species coral
in family)
FAMILY Faviidae
Faviidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Fungiidae
Fungiidae (all species in family) coral, mushroom
FAMILY Merulinidae
Merulinidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Mussidae
Mussidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Oculinidae
Oculinidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Pectiniidae
Pectiniidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Pocilloporidae
Pocilloporidae (all species coral
in family)
FAMILY Poritidae
Poritidae (all species in family) coral
FAMILY Siderastreidae
Siderastreidae (all species coral
in family)
FAMILY Trachyphylliidae
Trachyphylliidae (all species coral
in family)

ORDER Zoantharia
FAMILY Epizoanthidae
Epizoanthidae (all species polyp, button
in family)
FAMILY Parazoanthidae
Parazoanthidae (all species polyp, button
in family)
FAMILY Zoanthidae
Zoanthidae (all species in family) polyp, button

CLASS Hydrozoa
ORDER Hydroidea
FAMILY Stylasteridae
Stylasteridae (all species in family) coral, lace


So yeah, my jaw dropped when I saw that list. FWIW, all these PDFS were found at http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/pi_pq_lists.htm

Not sure exactly what the restrictions mean...I'm sure that's another bit of legislation or documents somewhere else!

Matt
Last edited by Anonymous on Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mpedersen » Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:40 am

Well here's the rules - http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/adminrules/AR-71.pdf - somewhat defines what the "restrictions" mean.

There's another list too!
"LIST OF CONDITIONALLY-APPROVED ANIMALS" - I may have missed some fish families in here...

Pursuant to the requirements of subsection
(a) herein, the introduction of animals on the lists
of conditionally-approved or restricted animals is
allowed as follows:
(1) Animals on the list of
conditionally-approved animals, for
individual possession, businesses, or
institutions;

http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/adminrules/AR-71C.pdf

ORDER Beryciformes
FAMILY Anomalopidae
Anomalopidae (all species in lanterneye fish
family)

FAMILY Holocentridae
Holocentridae (all species in squirrelfish
family)

FAMILY Monocentrididae
Monocentrididae (all species pinecone fish
in family)



ORDER Dactylopteriformes
FAMILY Dactylopteridae
Dactylopteridae (all species gurnard, flying
in family)

ORDER Gadiformes
FAMILY Bythitidae
Bythitidae (all species in brotulid
family)
FAMILY Carapodidae
Carapodidae (all species in pearl fish
family)

ORDER Gasterosteiformes
FAMILY Aulostomidae
Aulostomidae (all species in trumpetfish
family)

FAMILY Centriscidae
Centriscidae (all species in shrimpfish
family)

FAMILY Fistulariidae
Fistulariidae (all species in cornetfish
family)

FAMILY Indostomidae
Indostomus paradoxus paradox fish

FAMILY Syngnathidae
Syngnathidae (all species in pipefish
family)

ORDER Gobiesociformes
FAMILY Callionymidae
Callionymidae (all species in dragonet
family)

FAMILY Gobiesocidae
Gobiesocidae (all species in clingfish
family)

ORDER Lophiiformes
FAMILY Antennariidae
Antennariidae (all species in anglerfish
family)

FAMILY Ogcocephalidae
Ogcocephalidae (all species in batfish
family)

ORDER Perciformes
FAMILY Acanthuridae
Acanthuridae (all species in surgeonfish
family)

FAMILY Apogonidae
Apogonidae (all species in cardinalfish
family)

FAMILY Blenniidae
Blenniidae (all species in blenny
family)

FAMILY Caesionidae
Caesio pulcherrimus caesio fish

FAMILY Carangidae
Carangidae (all species in jack
family)


FAMILY Chaetodontidae
Chaetodontidae (all species in butterflyfish
family)

FAMILY Cirrhitidae
Cirrhitidae (all species in hawkfish
family)

FAMILY Echeneidae
Echeneis naucrates

FAMILY Enoplosidae
Enoplosus armatus oldwife

FAMILY Ephippididae
Ephippididae (all species in spadefish
family)

FAMILY Gerreidae
Gerreidae (all species in mojarra, spotfin
family)

FAMILY Gobiidae
Gobiidae (all species in goby
family)

FAMILY Grammidae
Grammidae (all species in basslet
family)

FAMILY Grammistidae
Grammistidae (all species in soapfish
family)

FAMILY Haemulidae
Haemulidae (all species in grunt
family)

FAMILY Labridae
Labridae (all species in wrasse
family)

FAMILY Lutjanidae
Lutjanidae (all species in snapper
family)

FAMILY Malacanthidae
Malacanthidae (all species in tilefish
family)

FAMILY Mullidae
Mullidae (all species in goatfish
family)

FAMILY Nemipteridae
Scolopsis bilineatus snapper, two-lined
Scolopsis cancellatus snapper, yellow stripe

FAMILY Opistognathidae
Opistognathidae (all species jawfish
in family)

FAMILY Pholidichthyidae
Pholidichthys leucotaenia goby, convict worm

FAMILY Plesiopidae
Plesiopidae (all species in betta, marine
family)

FAMILY Pomacanthidae
Pomacanthidae (all species in angelfish
family)

FAMILY Pomacentridae
Pomacentridae (all species in damselfish
family)

FAMILY Priacanthidae
Priacanthidae (all species in big-eye
family)

FAMILY Pseudochromidae
Pseudochromidae (all species dottyback
in family)

FAMILY Scaridae
Scaridae (all species in parrotfish
family)

FAMILY Scatophagidae
Scatophagidae (all species in scat
family)

FAMILY Sciaenidae
Equetus acuminatus cubbyu; cubbyu, high hat
Equetus lanceolatus jackknife fish
Equetus punctatus drum, spotted

FAMILY Scorpididae
Scorpididae (all species in stripey
family)

FAMILY Serranidae
Serranidae (all species in grouper
family)

ORDER Tetraodontiformes
FAMILY Balistidae
Balistidae (all species in leatherjacket
family)

FAMILY Diodontidae
Diodontidae (all species in porcupinefish
family)

FAMILY Monacanthidae
Monacanthidae (all species in filefish
family)

FAMILY Ostraciidae
Ostraciidae (all species in boxfish
family)

FAMILY Tetraodontidae
Tetraodontidae (all species in puffer
family)

FAMILY Triodontidae
Triodon macropterus puffer, three-toothed
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Postby mpedersen » Wed Apr 09, 2008 3:48 am

OK, so it's a little jumbled, basically no one can have Lionfish for the most part, and surprisngly private individuals can't have Foxfaces / Rabbitfish either (which kindof doesn't make sense considering you can have TANGS, Frogfish and Anglers!). The restricted species have little to do with potential for environmental impact and it seems much more to do with the fact that they are venemous?! Is that a fairly accurate assumption as to why they're highly restricted / prohibited?
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Postby gconcepcion » Wed Apr 16, 2008 8:52 pm

Hi Matt,

I think (if what you stated in your original post is correct) you're mixing up the rules on IMPORTING vs KEEPING marine ornamentals in Hawaii. In your original post you stated that you were interested on what the restrictions for marine ornamentals are.

Importing ANYTHING into Hawaii is generally a headache because of all the hoops you must go through to ensure new species aren't introduced into the ecosystem.

however KEEPING marine ornamentals is a different story.
Pretty much any ornamental fish you can catch is fair game. You can go to:
http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar/fish_regs/index.htm
for a list of fishing restrictions, and the only fish that are restricted are the big game fish that have size/catch limits. A hobbyist/collector is allowed to collect a certain amount of fish per day depending on the type of permit you have.

As far as inverts go you can pretty much keep anything EXCEPT stony corals. Also, you are not allowed to take ANY rock from BELOW the high tide line so that eliminates most benthic inverts that are attached to the substrate.

Other than that, it's pretty much all fair game. You can even buy imported tropical fish from the major fish importers in town.

I think importing your onyx percs would be more of a hassle than buying a new pair here. Plenty of clownfish on the island.

I hope this sheds some light for you
Last edited by gconcepcion on Mon Jun 23, 2008 2:34 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re:

Postby mpedersen » Thu Apr 17, 2008 1:07 am

Hey G, welcome to MOFIB!

gconcepcion wrote:Hi Matt,

I think (if what you stated in your original post is correct) you're mixing up the rules on IMPORTING vs KEEPING marine ornamentals in Hawaii. In your original post you stated that you were interested on what the restrictions for marine ornamentals are.


Well, frankly the main interest was what can a private individual or company keep in an aquarium in the state of Hawaii.

Importing ANYTHING into Hawaii is generally a headache because of all the hoops you must go through to ensure new species aren't introduced into the ecosystem.


Indeed. What I've posted above is all the various restrictions for importation. I suppose that if you can't legally IMPORT something and you cannot find it natively, that means it is illegal to possess :)

however KEEPING marine ornamentals is a different story.
Pretty much any ornamental fish you can catch is fair game. You can go to:
http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar/fish_regs/index.htm
for a list of fishing restrictions, and the only fish that are restricted are the big game fish that have size/catch limits. A hobbyist/collector is allowed to collect a certain amount of fish per day depending on the type of permit you have.


Before we went to Kauai, I noticed there are certain marine ornamentals that are off limits even for collection by hobbyists (i.e. Convict Tangs). It appears that in the last few weeks that regulation changed?

I think importing your onyx percs would be more of a hassle than buying a new pair here. Plenty of clownfish on the island.


Buying a new pair of Onyx Percs is pretty tough to find ANYWHERE, let alone a proven spawning pair :) IF I was to EVER "migrate" way westward, the percs have to come with (they're my wife's fish too!).

BTW, side note, the Hawaii Dept. of Education was only looking for High School Teachers from the mainland this year...no interviews for Renee :(

Matt
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Postby gconcepcion » Thu Apr 17, 2008 3:03 pm

Hey G, welcome to MOFIB!

Thanks! glad to be here!

Before we went to Kauai, I noticed there are certain marine ornamentals that are off limits even for collection by hobbyists (i.e. Convict Tangs). It appears that in the last few weeks that regulation changed?


The only regulations i'm aware of (and they're in the link that I posted previously) are on three species of tang that are often eaten so they impose size limits. Convict tangs must be greater than 5 inches. (they're good if you catch a bunch and throw them on the bbq). The other species are Unicorn tang(Naso unicornis), and Naso hexacanthus. I don't think i've seen either of which in the hobby with much frequency due to their dull colors and large sizes. I don't believe any regulations have changed recently.

Buying a new pair of Onyx Percs is pretty tough to find ANYWHERE, let alone a proven spawning pair IF I was to EVER "migrate" way westward, the percs have to come with (they're my wife's fish too!).


I have to admit, I haven't actually looked for Onyx percs out here, so I can't tell you about their whereabouts. If I remember correctly, Onyx percs are selectively bred for their coloration and not just a wild color morph. If that's the case, you might have an interesting niche market out here. We don't get alot of captive bred stuff, pretty much everything is straight from the reef.


Sorry to hear about the job prospects![/i]
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Re:

Postby mpedersen » Thu Apr 17, 2008 3:13 pm

gconcepcion wrote: If I remember correctly, Onyx percs are selectively bred for their coloration and not just a wild color morph.


You're maybe 50% accurate. There are indeed WC onyx perculas (my broodstock pair is wild, many other breeders here have great examples of WC Onyx - they typically come from shallow waters in the Solomon Islands / Papua New Guinea). The C-Quest line was selectively bred starting with Bill Addison, who got "Onyx" babies out of regularly colored percs. But recently we added a new wrinkle to the mystery, which is simply that I had a WC Onyx, showing the Onyx Coloration, lose all it's black. The genotype did not change, but the phenotype sure did! I've also seen this happen a couple times in the offspring from my pair...i.e .they go out there, get great black color, then get moved and it goes away. Bottom line, it sounds like there are external factors, not just genetics, at play. It's also very possible that one or both of the parents that founded the Onyx line were indeed "Onyx" clownfish even though they did not outwardly show the color.

It's still a big mystery to date!

gconcepcion wrote:Convict tangs must be greater than 5 inches.


The documentation I remember reading said Convict Tangs are "reserved for native use".

FWIW,

Matt
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Postby gconcepcion » Thu Apr 17, 2008 8:19 pm

The C-Quest line was selectively bred starting with Bill Addison, who got "Onyx" babies out of regularly colored percs. But recently we added a new wrinkle to the mystery, which is simply that I had a WC Onyx, showing the Onyx Coloration, lose all it's black. The genotype did not change, but the phenotype sure did! I've also seen this happen a couple times in the offspring from my pair...i.e .they go out there, get great black color, then get moved and it goes away. Bottom line, it sounds like there are external factors, not just genetics, at play. It's also very possible that one or both of the parents that founded the Onyx line were indeed "Onyx" clownfish even though they did not outwardly show the color.


That sounds like an interesting mystery well suited for the molecular lab I work in. Now we just need to find a way to spin it and make it relevant from a conservation standpoint to get funding!
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Postby TheCoralShoppe » Thu Apr 17, 2008 9:54 pm

Come on Matt....like your gonna give up the salmon/steelhead fishing....LOL Good going though if you make it to Hawaii....I'd be satisfyed with going there one vacation for once in my life!
Mike Meadows, President
The Coral Shoppe div.
The Coral Conservation Company, LLC.

216-459-0265-Office
CoralConservationcollc@gmail.com
http://www.coralshoppe.com
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Re:

Postby Greshamh » Fri Apr 18, 2008 2:09 pm

TheCoralShoppe wrote:Come on Matt....like your gonna give up the salmon/steelhead fishing....LOL Good going though if you make it to Hawaii....I'd be satisfyed with going there one vacation for once in my life!


You can get fairly cheap flights to the west coast mainland from there :D WA still has pretty healthy salmon and steely runs. Cali just called the season off so don't come here looking for either salmon or steelies :D
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Re:

Postby mpedersen » Sun Apr 20, 2008 11:17 pm

gconcepcion wrote:That sounds like an interesting mystery well suited for the molecular lab I work in. Now we just need to find a way to spin it and make it relevant from a conservation standpoint to get funding!


I'd love to know where my WILD ones came from!!! A little bit of a fin suffice for testing??? ;)
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Postby gconcepcion » Mon Apr 21, 2008 2:46 pm

I'd love to know where my WILD ones came from!!! A little bit of a fin suffice for testing???


That's actually all we need. We have a pretty extensive Indo-Pacific reef fish finclip library, unfortunately I don't think we have any Amphiprion samples which would make identification to a locale pretty difficult.
The Toonen-Bowen Lab:
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~toonen/
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Postby the808state » Sun Jun 22, 2008 3:08 pm

Hi all... new to the site.

There are some strange laws here in this state. I can see the reasoning being some, but others make me shake my head. I really feel a lot of these laws were made by individuals that have no clue about the ocean or how the ecosystem really works.

I am currently in the process of contacting Department of Land and Natural Resources, Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Aquatic Resources to collect information prior to writing up a business plan. The government agency have provided little or no help since most of the employees really don't understand the restrictions themselves.

I have received great help from HawaiiAquaculture.org

I'm floating around the idea of farming local Zoathus, Palythoa, and Protopalythoa for the ornamental hobby.

I'm learning a lot by running through some of these laws and regulations. What blows my mind is the wastewater requirements even if my water and specimens are from local waters. I guess you have to play the game though.

Here is a fun one: http://hawaii.gov/dlnr/dar/regs/ch74.pdf
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Re:

Postby gconcepcion » Mon Jun 23, 2008 2:46 am

the808state wrote:Hi all... new to the site.

There are some strange laws here in this state. I can see the reasoning being some, but others make me shake my head. I really feel a lot of these laws were made by individuals that have no clue about the ocean or how the ecosystem really works.


Welcome.
I guarantee that is precisely how the laws were made

the808state wrote:I am currently in the process of contacting Department of Land and Natural Resources, Department of Agriculture, and the Department of Aquatic Resources to collect information prior to writing up a business plan. The government agency have provided little or no help since most of the employees really don't understand the restrictions themselves.


You'll get little to no help from them. They don't know, and don't care to know. They think that if they stick their heads in the sand, the questions will go away.

the808state wrote:I'm floating around the idea of farming local Zoathus, Palythoa, and Protopalythoa for the ornamental hobby.

I'm learning a lot by running through some of these laws and regulations. What blows my mind is the wastewater requirements even if my water and specimens are from local waters. I guess you have to play the game though.


You must be talking massive quantity if you're worried about wastewater. Is your facility located on the coast? Why can't you just divert wastewater onto solid ground, that should eliminate the possibility of it seeping into the ocean.

It's funny how hard they fight to regulate the guy that's trying to do it legitimately, when there are so many who blatantly break the rules and get away with it.
The Toonen-Bowen Lab:
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~toonen/
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Location: Hawaii

Re:

Postby the808state » Mon Jun 23, 2008 3:20 am

gconcepcion wrote:
the808state wrote:I'm learning a lot by running through some of these laws and regulations. What blows my mind is the wastewater requirements even if my water and specimens are from local waters. I guess you have to play the game though.


You must be talking massive quantity if you're worried about wastewater. Is your facility located on the coast? Why can't you just divert wastewater onto solid ground, that should eliminate the possibility of it seeping into the ocean.

It's funny how hard they fight to regulate the guy that's trying to do it legitimately, when there are so many who blatantly break the rules and get away with it.


That is the worst part... I haven't started yet, but i plan to run no more than (3) 40 gallon tanks. They are worried about the waste water from water changes.

Stores like MPC and CFH are not disposing of their wastewater in this manner, but yet they will regulate me with a minimal "backyard" operation.

Here is my last e-mail, even after i told them about using WA water and only farming local species...

[in reference to questioning the aquaculture facility permit] You must prove that you are culturing these corals in a responsible mannner, without the need to continually go back to the "field" to collect new cuttings/specimens to culture and sell.

Diposal of effluent must include disinfection and killing of all organisms in the water with Chlorox or any kind of bleach and then flushing into the city disposal system with copious amounts of water to dlute seawater and chemicals to appreciable levels. You will need to have a large tub for this purpose with pumps to move water around to sink drain. A locked and secured culture area should be separated from the home and living space.

Effluent Water and Invasive species. Shipping of organisms and disposal of effluent waters includes the observation of fact that you have no ancillary organisms attached or symbionts. Shipping these with the soft corals you want to sell is a no-no. You would require your recipient to have permits for importation at their end. You may be liable for a fine not from the Hawaii side but from the receiving side.


I am successfully propagating these palythoas in my hobby tank without trying. lol (i just can't sell them, so i give them to friends) yet, i will have to be inspected to make sure i can provide a healthy environment. This is soft coral and not cattle.

but i guess you have to play the game in this state... I've yet to start this project. I'm currently in just the planning phase to see if it is worth my time.
the808state
 
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Location: Honolulu


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