Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Postby Hellaenergy » Tue Jun 29, 2010 1:40 am

I'm looking to buy a compound stereo microscope for use in my hatchery.

Requirements:
40x Magnification
Light Source Included
Counting Cell
Ability to take pictures and video

Does anyone have any recommendations? What's a good bang for the buck that will last?

I have not yet decided on how much I'm willing (or should) invest in this microscope. Your opinions on this is welcomed and appreciated.
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Re: Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Postby spawner » Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:06 pm

Well you get what you pay for. Budget? If you spend 1500 you can get a pretty decent scope. Spend 400 and you can get an ok one. I'd use an external camera system.
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Re: Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Postby BaboonScience » Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:18 pm

Andy
I agree, you get what you pay for.
To save a few bucks, you can purchase used. We have discussed this in previous threads.
We also agree on an external camera. I believe that a trinocular scope (A scope with a camera mount) is the best way to mount an external camera but these get pricy.

Ebay is a good place for used if you know what you are looking for. Usually, the worst problem is that the scopes have been in a cabinet in some university and are dusty and dirty. A careful cleaning and some are like new.
If you do not know about scopes, perhaps the new route. Then andy is 100% correct. Quality is almost directly proportional to cost. Nikon, Olympus and the German scopes are the best IMO and well worth the money.

Used, the above plus AO, B&L and a few other older scopes.
A wealth of pointers can be found here:
http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/index.html

John
"The exact contrary of what is generally believed is often the truth" Jean De La Bruyère (1645-1696)
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Re: Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Postby Hellaenergy » Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:29 pm

spawner wrote:Well you get what you pay for. Budget? If you spend 1500 you can get a pretty decent scope. Spend 400 and you can get an ok one. I'd use an external camera system.


Why do you suggest an external camera system? Any specific brands or models you would recommend? What makes the $1500 scope better than the $400 one and why is that important when looking at an organism or a culture?
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Re: Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Postby Hellaenergy » Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:39 pm

Thanks for the info and the link, BaboonScience. What are your guy's thoughts on this scope?:

Wolfe® StereoPro Zoom Trinocular Stereomicroscope
http://www.carolina.com/product/equipme ... y=ourPicks
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Re: Purchasing a Compound Stereo Microscope

Postby BaboonScience » Wed Jun 30, 2010 5:53 pm

The scope that you referenced is a Stereo Dissecting Microscope with a Camera mount. This scope delivers magnifications from 10 x to 40 x and has a wider field of view. Magnification is low enough that the average human can manipulate fine instruments under the scope while watching through it.

If you are wishing to look at phytoplankton, you will need a compound microscope. Also if you wish to look at the finer structure of larger organisms. These usually have multiple objective lenses mounted on a turret called a nose piece. The top end is pretty muck the same as a dissecting scope.

Usually, Carolina has fairly decent products. That particular scope has a pretty decent set of features. For the price, it should prove to suit your needs.
If you do purchase it and get pics off of it, let us know how you like it. Post some pics.
John
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