Rhinomuraena quaesita (Blue / Black Ribbon Eel Eggs)

Rhinomuraena quaesita (Blue / Black Ribbon Eel Eggs)

Postby vdp » Tue Apr 22, 2008 8:55 am

From 2001 but interresting, fertile eggs from this species.

Strange thing is both animals were black, normally black animals are presumed males, blue young females and yellow ones older females.
A more detailed article is in Der Meerwasseraquarianer 1/2002 or 1/2001 don' t remember.

http://www.recif-france.com/Articles/Ec ... urenes.htm
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Postby mpedersen » Tue Apr 22, 2008 9:43 am

NICE FIND - ESPECIALLY the part about both fish being BLACK - that is unusual and turns the conventional wisdom on it's ear...
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Postby vdp » Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:00 am

the article is in the 2002 isue.
The author says the sexes can bet told by looking at the snouth. Suposedly the male has a swelling between the eyes and the nostrils

BTW did you see the size of those eggs?
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Postby mpedersen » Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:54 am

I think this link may work to link directly to the google translation of the article -

http://translate.google.com/translate?u ... en&ie=UTF8

This is VERY interesting. Makes me want to go get Blue Ribbon Eels for my 24 gallon cubes!! ;)

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Postby FMarini » Tue Apr 22, 2008 1:20 pm

that would be great---but in general terms these eels are terrible feeders. I'd say 99.99% of them die in captivity because they refuse to feed.
Huge eggs thou , but isn't the problem w/ eels in general is a painfully long planktonic phase, and a weird intermediate larvae
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Re:

Postby mpedersen » Tue Apr 22, 2008 1:26 pm

FMarini wrote:Huge eggs thou , but isn't the problem w/ eels in general is a painfully long planktonic phase, and a weird intermediate larvae


The Letocephalus larvae?

I wonder though, isn't the general notion that fish with longer pelagic phases have smaller eggs that hatch earlier? In the case of these eggs, they are fairly large...wouldn't that somewhat lead us to believe that there is at least the possibility for a large larvae with potentially short planktonic phase or even direct development? I mean, seriously, those are some big eggs!

And I have to ask, do Ribbon Eels belong in the "Moray Eel" forum? Are they in the same family group? It may not necessarily be that we can take what we know about Morays and apply it to Ribbon Eels, especially if they are actually not closely related (and again, I simply honestly don't know...can someone tell me / us)?

Matt
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Postby vdp » Wed Apr 23, 2008 4:14 am

Leptocephalus larvae usually grow to about 20 cm before settlement. I don' t believe a +- 10 cm leptocephalus larvae would require pod nauplii to be fed, probably here the problem isn' t the feeding but the pelagic nature of the larvae. Of course one would need food off the apropriate size and with the nutritional composition.
IMHO the biggest problem would be providing a 'pelagic' environment for the time neccesary (up to several years) to get them to settlement.

Here there is a note, unfortunately not backed up by references, that a leptocephalus larvae was captured and kept untill META
http://www.wcs.org/67378/factsheetarchi ... t-morayeel

These get 5 days after hatch from eals wuold be nice to keep track of.
http://www.aquarticles.com/articles/bre ... n_eel.html

note egg size is about 1 mm for anguilla

Here ref to development into glass eels.
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/k ... 2/00000024

http://easonline.org/files/Meetings/eas ... report.pdf
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Re:

Postby mpedersen » Wed Apr 23, 2008 2:03 pm

vdp wrote:IMHO the biggest problem would be providing a 'pelagic' environment for the time neccesary (up to several years) to get them to settlement.


Assuming these larvae could not maintain their own position in the water column, this is where full sized Kriesels and other techniques used to maintain Jellyfish could be applied. I.e. see the current CORAL magazine article on Moon Jellies...

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Re: Rhinomuraena quaesita (Blue / Black Ribbon Eel Eggs)

Postby Midnight Angel » Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:50 am

Thanks for posting. I'm glad to hear this. :D Please keep us posted on how they do !


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Re: Rhinomuraena quaesita (Blue / Black Ribbon Eel Eggs)

Postby "Umm, fish?" » Fri Nov 20, 2009 8:50 pm

Amy, don't get your hopes up. That was a spam bot. If you Google the text of their message you can find the original.
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Re: Rhinomuraena quaesita (Blue / Black Ribbon Eel Eggs)

Postby Midnight Angel » Fri Nov 20, 2009 9:16 pm

Thanks.........well that sucks ! :evil:


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