Does this count as an Invertebrate?

Does this count as an Invertebrate?

Postby William » Fri Oct 12, 2007 4:34 pm

Where does the sexual reproduction of ornamental plants and algae go?

Halimeda spawning....
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Postby mpedersen » Tue Jan 08, 2008 4:18 pm

Will, I can't believe I didn't catch that ealier. Do we even call it "spawning" when we talk about the sexual reproduction of plants?

HARUMP! Time for yet another new forum?!

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Postby blacksnail » Sat Dec 13, 2008 3:10 am

isnt it a protist?
not a plant?

i want to breed the greens... maby ill actualy be good at it. lol.
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Postby Spracklcat » Sat Dec 13, 2008 2:12 pm

Not a plant--you would need a plant category and a macroalgae category
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Postby blacksnail » Sat Dec 13, 2008 7:46 pm

heck throw a microalgea catagory in there too...
make some tang foder. lol.


but on a serious note i do like the macroalgea and i have a few species that i realy enjoy growing.
i always just thought i was weerd cuz most people jsut throw them in a refugium and thats the end of it.
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Postby Spracklcat » Sat Dec 13, 2008 8:09 pm

microalgae=phytoplankton.

:wink:
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Postby blacksnail » Mon Dec 15, 2008 12:00 am

arnt other algeas micro too?
like bryopsis and diatoms?

idk i havent reserched it its just the way it was explaned to me.

macro=kelp and calurpa and halmeda and the like
micro= icky glass algea and the like.
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Postby Spracklcat » Mon Dec 15, 2008 12:42 pm

Microalgae are single-celled, so diatoms are considered microalgae. Bryopsis is a macro--anything multicellular would fit into that category.
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Re:

Postby William » Mon Dec 15, 2008 1:40 pm

Spracklcat wrote:microalgae=phytoplankton.

:wink:

Spracklcat wrote:Microalgae are single-celled, so diatoms are considered microalgae. Bryopsis is a macro--anything multicellular would fit into that category.


You seem to be using two incompatible sets of definitions.

microalgae = phytoplankton = planktonic algae
microalgae = unicellular algae

So Sargassum is microalgae by definition 1, but not microalgae by definition 2
And the diatoms growing on my glass is not micro algae by defintion 1 but is microalgae by definition 2.

:D
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Postby Spracklcat » Mon Dec 15, 2008 5:05 pm

Microalgae also grow in soil, on tree bark, in association with fungi... plus not all diatoms are planktonic. :P

I think the absolute classification is somewhat stricter (excluding diatoms and cyanobacteria), but if you go to microalgae culture collections, they will have diatoms, plankton, etc.

Per "Microalgae Culture" (Amos Richmond, 2007):

"Phycologists regard any organisms with chlorophyll a and a thallus not differentiated into roots, stems and leaves to be an alga. Cyanobacteria are included in this definition, even though they are prokaryotic organisms. Therefore, in applied phycology the term microalgae refers to the microalgae sensu stricto, and the oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, ie the cyanobacteria, formerly known as Cyanophyceae
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Postby blacksnail » Mon Dec 15, 2008 8:52 pm

you guys are too damn smart or me.

isnt planktonic anything that cant swim against currents? like most jelly fish and almost all invert larva and those algeas that are pleagic?

and i was under the impression that bryopsis was a colonial microalgea, as in each cell is its own little organisum and is not dependent uppon the formation of other cells for its life like in macroalgea wich is dependent uppon the formation of holdfasts and other parts of the algea.

idk maby im in the wrong organization.
perhaps i need to find more retarded people to talk to.
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Postby Spracklcat » Mon Dec 15, 2008 9:19 pm

Not necessarily smart--just persistent with good references or lots of school :)

bryopsis: http://www.algaebase.org/search/genus/detail/?genus_id=8&sk=0 (macro)

(algaebase.org is a great reference for all types of algae)

Pelagic in this context means free floating as opposed to benthic which means attached to or sitting on the bottom. Planktonic (to me) implies free-floating small things, ie zooplankton and phytoplankton, though krill and things like it are bigger than what aquarists think of as plankton, but are considered as such.
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Re:

Postby William » Mon Dec 15, 2008 10:45 pm

Spracklcat wrote:Pelagic in this context means free floating....though krill and things like it are bigger than what aquarists think of as plankton, but are considered as such.


Yep plankton says nothing about size. From a single celled algae, all the way up to a 500lb+ lions main jellyfish. Pelagic just means that it can not/does not swim against the current.

If your direction of travel is determined by the will of the ocean, you are plankton. If you choose where you go (either by swimming or by staying near/on the bottom), then you are not plankton.

But no planktonic is not the opposite of benthic. (although with algae, they pretty much all fall into one of the two categories), but many creatures can swim plenty fast to choose where they go (so they are not plankton) but never go anywhere near the bottom (thus not benthic as benthic = stays near the bottom). For example many sharks or squid may never see the bottom but are not plankton as they are skilled swimmers.
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Postby leanne » Mon Dec 15, 2008 11:08 pm

Can we not call it xooanthellic v/s chloroplastic?
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Postby Spracklcat » Tue Dec 16, 2008 1:04 pm

Then you are getting onto chemotrophic versus phototrophic.

One thing to keep in mind as well is that aquarist's colloquial definition are not always the same as scientific jargon. Think about how we use the word alkalinity, and how it is used in every other application--two completely different meanings.
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Postby blacksnail » Tue Dec 16, 2008 8:52 pm

haha i wrote a paper for my marine bio class on benthic organisums. :)

most benthic oganisums are planktonic at some point in there life, usualy when they are born untill they settle.

and theres a jellyfish that goes from sessile to nonsessile back and forth dozens of times over its life. cant remember its name but i seem to recal it being from the medeteranian ocenan. or however you spell it.
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