Breeding L.amboinensis

Re:

Postby Zaita » Sun Sep 14, 2008 3:45 pm

FuEl wrote:A little info from my own unpublished data (don't think I'll ever get to getting it published, too many distractions at the moment).

Regarding larval starvation:
Larvae fed immediately after hatching showed no significant difference in survival up to zoea IV compared to larvae starved for 6, 12, 24 and 48 hours.

Larvae can be starved for up to 12h post-hatch without any significant impact on development time to zoea VI. Those starved for 24 and 48 hours exhibit significant extended development time from zoea III onwards.


Hmmm. This is in directly contradiction with scientific papers I have read in the last 10days. I'll find links and post later today.
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Postby Zaita » Sun Sep 14, 2008 3:52 pm

Ok. Found them sooner than I thought.

Note: These are copy of the article abstract. So shouldn't violate any copyright rules. I have provided links to the full documents too. Articles are available freely (I think) online.

Identifying appropriate larval husbandry is a key to improve larval quality and shorten duration of larval stages, and culture costs of ornamental cleaner shrimps Lysmata amboinensis. Several feeding and zootechnical experiments were conducted under laboratory conditions to test the effect of food during the first day posthatch, the effect of feeding with microalgae on larval digestion after 24 h posthatch, the effect of enriched rotifers upon survival and the combined effect of stocking density and food concentration on growth and survival of young larvae. For the first time, oxygen consumption values, trypsin-like activity and metabolite content (protein and triacylglycerols) were determined for L. amboinensis early stage larvae. When starved during the first day of life, L. amboinensis larvae had the same oxygen consumption as fed larvae, indicating that food ingestion is not crucial during that period. Nevertheless, energy reserves such as TAG were significantly lower in 24 h starved larvae when compared with fed larvae indicating facultative primary lecitotrophy. Trypsin-like activity of digestive enzymes (U mg prot− 1) was low when compared with other decapod larvae. Larvae fed with Tetraselmis chuii showed a significant increase in enzyme activity after 24 h. Present results showed that enriched rotifers result in higher larval survival during the first days of life when compared with larvae fed with non-enriched rotifers and that survival is not dependent on the relation between larval density and food concentration. In addition, stocking densities of 10 larvae ml− 1 showed higher survival compared to that obtained at the stocking density of 20 larvae ml− 1.

Experimental studies on the effect of food in early larvae of the cleaner shrimp Lysmata amboinensis (De Mann, 1888) (Decapoda: Caridea: Hippolytidae)
Luís Cunhaa, , , Maite Mascarob, Xavier Chiapab, Ana Costaa, c and Nuno Simoesb

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2008.02.014


The present work evaluates the resistance of newly hatched Lysmata amboinensis, Lysmata ankeri, L. debelius and Lysmata seticaudata larvae to 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h of starvation after hatching, as well as their ability to capture newly hatched Artemia nauplii and enriched metanauplii, under different light regimes (24, 12 and 0 h of light). Additionally, it analyses the feeding and swimming behavior of newly hatched larvae and compares their morphological and biometrical features. L. ankeri and L. seticaudata displayed higher resistance to starvation than L. amboinensis and L. debelius, molting to zoea II in the absence of food. Larvae starved for longer periods and kept in darkness displayed higher survival rates, probably due to a lower energy consumption induced by reduced swimming activity. Light regimes did not influence Lysmata ability to capture larval preys, reinforcing the idea that these larvae do not display true hunting behaviors, rather relying on chance encounters with dietary preys. All Lysmata larvae consumed similar levels of Artemia nauplii, while L. ankeri and L. seticaudata were able to consume a significantly higher amount of enriched metanauplii than L. amboinensis and L. debelius. Interspecific larval size variability, similar swimming ability and the inexistence of morphological features more specialized for prey capture in L. ankeri or L. seticaudata larvae exclude larval morphology and biometry as explanations for the different consumption rates recorded. The ability of Lysmata larvae to capture large dietary preys opens good perspectives for the use of inert diets at an early stage.

Importance of light and larval morphology in starvation resistance and feeding ability of newly hatched marine ornamental shrimps Lysmata spp. (Decapoda: Hippolytidae)
Ricardo Caladoa, b, , , Gisela Dionísioa, Cátia Bartilottic, Cristovão Nunesa, Antonina dos Santosc and Maria Teresa Dinisa

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2008.07.010
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Re: frustrated with your post

Postby timinnl2 » Tue Nov 02, 2010 7:48 am

KathyL wrote:
Amie wrote:I don't know about you, but I really plan on figuring out how to raise these guys and I'm really committed to it. I've got 4 breeding pair right now. My biggest frustration is actually finding people that have raised them or have had some success and then not having them talk. They say that they are going to talk, but then they say they are too busy right now or they will get back with me later. Are they scared that I might raise enough of them in my basement to sell them to the world and take over the market? Maybe there's some rush to write a paper and be the first to make money off of it. But truthfully, I just don't get it. What's the big secret all about? It's got to come down to money (or glory, I guess) - most things do.

Anyway, I hope people really are serious about sharing their successes and failures here on this board. It's the only way that this can work.


Hi Amie,
Welcome to MOFIB! We are all glad you are here.

I would like to assure you that none of the reasons you are suggesting about lapses in the information content of the posts you've been reading are true. The breeding of cleaner shrimp is so difficult, and success has been so sparse, it would be hard to give an exact recipe, and also hard to know which parts are most imortant. In all the folks I know of who have attempted this, I don't think you could find a secretive or selfish bone. Some of them are not native english speakers, and although their written work is excellent, I do not doubt that it is a struggle, and the desire to be perfect can sometimes stifle completion of a piece of writing.

English is such a heavily nuanced language, it can also be difficult to know how one's writing is being read, without the advantages of facial expression and tone of voice. One needs to be generous about thinking positively about other peoples' motives and expressions. One needs to give the benefit of any doubt. In addition, one needs to be careful in writing, so that one's words cannot be misconstrued in a negative, and therefore, inhibiting, way. This is a very generous group, and I am sure no one holds any negative views of another. To do so would be tragic.

On the other hand, opinions are expressed freely, and should continue to do so. We all keep in mind that nothing said here should be taken personally, as it is never meant personally. We are here to further the art and science of fish and invert breeding, and that will best be done if we work together.

I am thrilled that you are taking on the cleaner shrimp! It is such a widely loved and kept animal, good for the health of most reef tanks. Everyone has seen the eggs and so far it has been nearly impossible to raise them. With such an easily spawnable animal, you have many chances to get it right, and I wish you the very best of luck. Figure out and document how to do this, and you will make quite a contribution!

Again, we are glad you are here and taking on this project. Best of luck!


Hi Kathy,

May I have your permission to copy the highlighted part.

Kind Regards,

Tim
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby Amie » Tue Nov 02, 2010 2:15 pm

Wow, that is a very old thread, written over 2 years ago. You might want to send her an email and ask her, I'm not sure if Kathy logs in that often anymore.

If you do not get a response from her, it is my understanding that you can legally quote someone as long as you give them the credit for the quote and state the reference of where it came from.
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby KathyL » Thu Nov 04, 2010 3:15 am

I am honored that you would like to repeat those words,and you have my permission to do so.
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby Jacksonh » Thu Oct 20, 2011 4:43 am

One question here . Does the adult eat their own larval when they stay in the same tank ?

thanks
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby konradzior » Thu Oct 20, 2011 12:08 pm

YES!!! :(
"Life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get." [W. Groom]
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby Jacksonh » Sun Jan 29, 2012 11:52 pm

Hi Luis ,

Any chance to post the pic of hydroids ? I would like to check if I have the same problem now .

BTW , Does those larval really catch and eat NHBBS ?

thanks

Jackson
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby Luis A M » Mon Jan 30, 2012 8:11 pm

Sure they take bbs.
See this interesting hydroid thread http://www.projectdibs.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1899
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby GBPUK » Sat Mar 03, 2012 5:43 pm

Luis, reading that only 10-12 people have raised these to settlement, do you know the highest number achieved ?
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby Luis A M » Sun Mar 04, 2012 2:29 pm

Very few,most of he times.I think Spawner could raise decent numbers,go ask him.
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Re: Breeding L.amboinensis

Postby malau » Fri May 18, 2012 12:00 pm

Should I increase or decrease the lighting for my peppermint larvae in your experience?
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