Octopus chierchiae breeding!

Octopus chierchiae breeding!

Postby Thales » Tue Jun 17, 2008 10:36 pm

I have been speaking about breeding these guys all year, and it finally happened. Me so happy!
This species hasn't been seen in the trade for 10-20 years, and through wheeling and dealing I was able to get three specimens and breed them. The adult female's mantle is about the size of a thumbnail and the babies are less than 1/4 inch. Even though they are nocturnal, they may be the perfect small aquarium octo - interesting to look at, easy to feed, and breed-able. I have two babies, hopefully more on the way - and even better, this species doesn't die after brooding and will continue to eat and brood more eggs throughout her life.

Adult:
Image


Baby:
Image
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Postby aomont » Tue Jun 17, 2008 11:12 pm

Thales I can´t tell how awesome I think it is... A tiny octopus breeding and the female stays alive after brooding. Put me on the list for a couple ! 8)
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Postby mpedersen » Wed Jun 18, 2008 2:23 am

WOW, that is nothing short of exceptional! What can you tell us about general care / conditioning / mating?
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Postby DrHsu » Wed Jun 18, 2008 3:47 am

Fantastic! :shock:

It really sounds like this species is an almost perfect aquarium species - stays small, cool looking, and best of all...does not die after breeding.

Could you tell us more about this species? First time I have heard of it
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Postby Thales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 2:47 pm

Image

More info soon!
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Postby mpedersen » Wed Jun 18, 2008 3:27 pm

Rich, it just hit me after seeing how small that baby is...I have the perfect live food in mind when seeing how small that baby octopus is - PROLARVAE of marine fish. Set yourself up with a small group of Centropyge argi and you could be hatching out 1000 prolarvae every day!
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Postby Thales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 7:00 pm

Trying to get me to set up yet another system! Arg! :D
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Postby ski's_reef » Wed Jun 18, 2008 9:09 pm

One of lfs I go to has gotten in two in the last two years. I bought both of them and kept them in nanos but neither made it past 6 months. I attributed this to a short natural lifespan but would like to hear your input because I could find very little info on this species. Definitley one of my favorite cephalopods so far. Will you be selling babies?

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Postby Thales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 9:31 pm

I'll be selling babies when I get enough brood stock - which is the hardest part of breeding these guys. So...not going to be selling any this round, they'll go to brood stock or research. :D There is very very little info on these guys.

The problem with wild caught cephs is that they are likely to be adults when collected and thus won't be around all that long.

They seem to be hitting FL, and not going much further. If you see any more, please buy them and send them to me. :D
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Postby aomont » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:04 pm

Any idea on how long they live ?
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Postby Thales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:20 pm

Bout a year.
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Postby William » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:30 pm

Very cool. Now you've got me wanting to try octopus. Are they aggressive toward conspecifics? Could you put say 6 or so in 20 gallon tank, or would they fight?
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Postby Thales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:31 pm

They'll most likely eat each other at some point.
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Re:

Postby aomont » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:39 pm

Thales wrote:Bout a year.

:(
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Re:

Postby PaulG » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:52 pm



:evil: use a a ruler, not everyone knows what the coin is (I'm guessing its a quarter? but don't remember the size of them)

At least most ppl know the conversion of inches to their native measurement system

This IS an international forum afterall :wink:

</rant>
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Postby Thales » Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:59 pm

Ruler is boring! :D How about an Aussie coin? When I shoot tomorrow, if I can find a ruler I'll take a shot. FWIW, thats a dime.






Found another baby tonight. :D

I am keeping them in plastic containers from Tap Plastics. I dremel out two holes on opposite sides and then super glue net from a net breeder in place. Then, I pop a hole in the lid and glue a piece of rigid tubing in place. The containers then go in a tank and are fed via an aqualifter and plastic gang valve, and the containers simply overflow into the tank. If I get a lot of babies, I'll feed the containers with a small power head and a manifold.

Image

Image
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Postby William » Wed Jun 18, 2008 11:00 pm

PaulG wrote::evil: use a a ruler, not everyone knows what the coin is (I'm guessing its a quarter? but don't remember the size of them)

At least most ppl know the conversion of inches to their native measurement system

This IS an international forum afterall :wink:

</rant>


Actually the coin is a dime (1/10 dollar ) Dimes are the smallest US coin with a diameter ~18mm.
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Postby Luis A M » Thu Jun 19, 2008 1:52 am

How you managed mating,is it risky?
Babies are not hatched as paralarvae?.
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Re:

Postby PaulG » Thu Jun 19, 2008 7:34 am

acroporas wrote:
PaulG wrote::evil: use a a ruler, not everyone knows what the coin is (I'm guessing its a quarter? but don't remember the size of them)

At least most ppl know the conversion of inches to their native measurement system

This IS an international forum afterall :wink:

</rant>


Actually the coin is a dime (1/10 dollar ) Dimes are the smallest US coin with a diameter ~18mm.


Kewl.... when I was in the states I asked the question of what denomination is a dime & all I got was 'its a dime' or strange looks... quite often it was both.
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Postby Thales » Thu Jun 19, 2008 6:56 pm

Mating is risky, but pretty easy. There is video here (there is music, so be ready):

http://stickycricket.com/aquarium/movies/oc_movie.html

Day 3
Image

The last time these were looked at really was in 1976 - there were babies, but they crashed a 100 days.

Yes, no paralarvae. :D Small egged octos go to paralarvae, large egged go benthic.
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Postby Peter Schmiedel » Fri Jun 20, 2008 5:19 am

Richard,

could you please post a video from their holding tank? How hard did you have to secure the top to prevent them form joy riding the carpet ?
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Re:

Postby Luis A M » Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:13 pm

Amazing video :shock: He was pumping the mantle like gasping!.And wow that colour flash looked like climax! :oops:
Thales wrote:Mating is risky, but pretty easy.

Meaning you put them together under surveillance,when you think the time is right?.Like tarantulas?
On a side note,my LFS has a walnut sized blue ringed.I always heard they are too dangerous to be owned by private keepers.What do you think? :?
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Re:

Postby Thales » Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:35 pm

Peter Schmiedel wrote:Richard,

could you please post a video from their holding tank? How hard did you have to secure the top to prevent them form joy riding the carpet ?


Here is some footage. I am working on putting together pages on my site for these guys and metasepia, but time is hard to find!

http://stickycricket.com/aquarium/movies/lilzebras.html

The water in the holding tank is a couple of inches from the top. All the slots for flow between the cubes and the overflow has fine mesh glued to it for the adults, as do the returns. The lids are glass, and just sit on top of the tanks, as these guys are small and havent shown much interest in leaving the water.
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Re:

Postby Thales » Fri Jun 20, 2008 3:39 pm

Luis A M wrote:Amazing video :shock: He was pumping the mantle like gasping!.And wow that colour flash looked like climax! :oops:


Thanks. They mated for about 4 minutes total. I will mate the female with another male after these eggs are all finished hatching.
Thales wrote:Mating is risky, but pretty easy.

Meaning you put them together under surveillance,when you think the time is right?.Like tarantulas?


You don't really have to wait for the time to be right, other than having a female not brooding. Octopus are sex machines, and these little guys will go at it pretty readily. Of course, it is under supervision because they can eat each other. :D

On a side note,my LFS has a walnut sized blue ringed.I always heard they are too dangerous to be owned by private keepers.What do you think? :?


They are absolutely dangerous, and if bitten you can easily die, especially if the correct treatment isn't given (just cpr till you start breathing again). Private keepers can keep them, but IMO must understand that they are like a cocked and loaded gun, and steps must be taken to assure they won't bite you or escape and bit you or someone else. FWIW, I haven't ever kept a blue ring. :D
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Re:

Postby Luis A M » Fri Jun 20, 2008 9:16 pm

Thales wrote:
On a side note,my LFS has a walnut sized blue ringed.I always heard they are too dangerous to be owned by private keepers.What do you think? :?


They are absolutely dangerous, and if bitten you can easily die, especially if the correct treatment isn't given (just cpr till you start breathing again). Private keepers can keep them, but IMO must understand that they are like a cocked and loaded gun, and steps must be taken to assure they won't bite you or escape and bit you or someone else. FWIW, I haven't ever kept a blue ring. :D


I won´t keep them either and advised the shop owner to be extremely careful.There are people that feel fascination for poisonous animals. :roll:
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