Breeding yellowheaded Jawfish-Seascope article

Breeding yellowheaded Jawfish-Seascope article

Postby Dman » Sat Jun 23, 2007 1:45 pm

I have in my possession the aforementioned issue from winter 1994 by John Walch. This article was reprinted from the original breeders registry article, 1993.
Would anyone be interested in it?
Preference would be given to someone who would be technologically capable of freely sharing this resource with others. ie. scan to pdf.
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Postby KathyL » Sat Jun 23, 2007 4:11 pm

I can. and will.
:lol:
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Postby Dman » Sat Jun 23, 2007 5:15 pm

Excellent,
PM your addy and I'll fire it off to you.
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Postby fin farm » Sat Jun 23, 2007 9:00 pm

excellent, I would definately be interested in a copy of that
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Postby mpedersen » Thu Jul 05, 2007 9:17 pm

Would love a copy too, especially in light of recent occurances.. ;)

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Postby "Umm, fish?" » Thu Jul 05, 2007 10:18 pm

I would like one too, please.

BTW, is it possible to find the older issues of SeaScope somewhere. I find the online archive of the newer PDFs (thanks Matt!), but I've found several references to older issues.
Andy

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Postby Dman » Thu Jul 05, 2007 11:03 pm

KathyL
Have you received them yet?
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Postby Peter Schmiedel » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:24 am

Kathy,

we would be interested in a copy too. Thanks for your efforts
Take care
Peter
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Postby KathyL » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:48 am

Hi, Yes I received the articles. Haven't had time to scan them yet. It's been a little crazy here. After about a month of little to no sales, I've sold about 300 fish this week! It's 2:45 am, can't sleep. Worried about shipped fish. I would scan the articles now, but the scanner is in the bedroom with sleeping husband. I will see what I can do about that particular article.

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Here's the text--fingers hurt from typing...

Postby KathyL » Fri Jul 06, 2007 4:55 am

Reproduction of Yellowhead Jawfish in Captivity by John Walch

As the interest in captive breeding of marine fish steadily increases, so does the list of species which are being raised successfully by hobbyists. One of the species which can be raised almost as easily as the anemonefish (Amphiprion sp.) is the yellowhead jawfish (Opistognathus aurifrons).

Characteristics

Most Opistognathsus are monomorphic, that is, displaying little or no external difference between the sexes. When shopping for a pair of jawfish you might detect a slight difference in the shape of the head or a temporary color difference during courtship. However, there is no remarkably obvious difference. To increase the odds of obtaining a pair, you should purchase 3 or 4 fish of varying sizes. O. aurifrons are somewhat communal in nature, and 3 or 4 fish can be kept in a 100 gallon aquarium with a sandy bottom and some shaded protected areas. An aquarium cover is essential because jawfish are “jumpers”, especially before they settle in.
In nature, jawfish live in burrows they excavate in the sandy bottom bordering coral reefs. Jawfish are excellent engineers who construct and reinforce their burrows with small pieces of dead coral, pebbles, and other debris. This activity of continual construction and home improvement is a major reason for their popularity in the aquarium trade.
Jawfish are demersal spawners (the eggs are heavier than water) and use mouthbrooding as their method of parental care. The egg mass is too large to be totally concealed in the mouth of the incubating fish who is usually male, so the eggs are very noticeable. The incubating fish will spit out and quickly suck back the egg mass to oxygenate it. He is seldom seen without the eggs, but may occasionally deposit them in the bottom of the burrow for a brief moment while he feeds. A pair of jawfish will spawn regularly every two weeks in captivity is proper nutrition is not maintained, the parents will eat the eggs before they hatch.

Eggs and Larva

The eggs start out whitish-yellow in color and darken as they develop. On day six of development the eyes of the larvae will start to darken, causing the eggs to appear speckled. On the day of the hatch the egg mass will appear silvery because the eye pigmentation has developed to the point where it reflects light. The eggs will normally hatch eight days after they are laid. At dusk, or approximately 20 minutes before the lights normally go out, jawfish enter their burrows for the night. A small rock or large piece of coral rubble is pulled over the entrance behind each fish to block the opening as protection from predators. On the evening the eggs are to hatch the incubating fish will enter his burrow but will not cover the entrance. He adjusts himself so his head is facing the opening and opens his mouth. The eggs will start hatching approximately one hour after dark and all fertile eggs will hatch within a half hour. The burrow entrance will remain uncovered for that entire night, allowing all the larvae to swim free.
Once the larvae hatch, the adults no longer administer any additional parental care and the larvae should be removed from the brood tank. This is a formidable challenge, and much more difficult than working with anemonefish, which lay their eggs on a substrate that can be transferred to the larval rearing tank before hatching. Most jawfish larvae are phototropic, or attracted to light, and the O. aurifrons larvae are no exception. If the larvae are attracted to the surface by a light, they can be gently siphoned from the tank or dipped out with a cup or bowl. Take care that the larvae are not exposed to air during this process. DO NOT USE A NET!

Larval Rearing

A jawfish spawn usually contains more than 1000 larvae, so the rearing tank should be large. The larger the water volume the more stable the water quality, but keep in mind you will need to maintain a high density of live food so the larvae can find it easily. A 20 gallon container is the smallest recommended tank size.
Because the larvae retain a small yolk sac after they hatch, feeding does not have to begin until the next normal daylight period 8 to 12 hours later. Some aquarists recommend inducing feeding by placing a light over the larval tank, or by extending the first photoperiod to 24 hours. However, if the nutritional value of the first food is adequate, induced or extended feeding is not necessary.
Rotifers (Brachionus sp.) are the right size to serve as the first food and the larvae will accept them. A rotifer, however, is primarily “what it eats” and is of little nutritional value to the larvae if the rotifer itself is starving. It does not matter if the rotifer is starving because adequate food itself is lacking the proper nutritional content. I have found that rotifers raised on yeast lack the essential highly unsaturated fatty acid of those raised on healthy micro-algae and are therefore not as nutritious.

Green-Water Technique

The larval rearing tank should be set up before the eggs hatch. A bare tank with black sides, no filtration, and an air stone with very limited air flow makes a suitable rearing tank. Because the larvae will be transferred after they hatch, the water quality in hatching and rearing tanks should be as similar as possible. A density of 20 to 25 larvae per gallon will give a good balance between larvae and live food.
After the larvae hatch and are transferred to the rearing tank, collect enough rotifers to stock the rearing tank at a density of 20 per milliliter (ml) and place them in 5 gallons of cultured micro-algae, Tetraselmis sp. And Nannochloropsis sp., will increase the nutritional content, but are not necessary. Allow the rotifers to feed on the algae until morning and then slowly add the entire 5 gallon rotifer mix to the rearing tank by siphoning it through the airline tubing. Then add more pH adjusted micro-algae until the tank has a cloudy green appearance. The algae will help to maintain good water quality and will also serve as a high nutrition food source for the rotifers.
It is a challenge to maintain the proper density of micro-algae and rotifers. Micro-algae must be added every day. Rotifers will usually reproduce faster then the larva can eat them, so the population must be thinned to maintain the original density. In some cases, however, it may be necessary to add additional rotifers to maintain a sufficient density so the larvae can locate them. This is a delicate balancing act requiring daily monitoring and adjustment.

Brine Shrimp

By the 10th day after hatching some jawfish larvae are large enough to start feeding on newly hatched brine shrimp. When the injections of brine shrimp hauplii begin, thin the rotifer population to a density of 5 per ml and continue to maintain the micro-algae density at the existing level. Do not feed more newly hatched brine shrimp than the larvae can eat in a day. Any uneaten brine shrimp nauplii will become too big for the larvae to eat and will compete with the rotifers for the limited amounts of micro-algae. This will result in rotifers that re nutritionally deficient.
By the 15th day after hatching all the larvae should be eating brine shrimp nauplii. You can discontinue adding micro-algae and should remove the excess rotifers. Enriched 48 hour old brine shrimp should be added to the larval diet. The larvae will require ample nutrition for metamorphosis which occurs 3 to 4 weeks after hatching. A general rule of thumb is “the longer the larval stage, the more difficult the species is to rear successfully”. This is because long larval stages require longer periods of good water quality and enriched nutrition. In comparison, the larval stage for anemonefish is about 10 days.
Once larvae go through metamorphosis, you can supplement their live food diet with prepared foods or wean them off live foods completely. However, nutrition will remains important to the color and grown rate of juvenile fish. Healthy enriched live foods offer more value than poorly prepared dry foods. It is also after metmorphosis that you should begin to make water exchanges. This is a very critical step, and the water quality must not change too rapidly. The new water should be added drop-by-drop. After the juvenile fish have been in normal aquarium water for a few days they can be transferred to grow-out tanks with coral rubble in the bottom to allow them to burrow.
This information is being offered to give the interested aquarist a reliable starting point. As we learn more about this pioneering science of rearing marine life, I am certain valuable improvements will be made to existing methods. Good luck and have fun!
Last edited by KathyL on Fri Jul 06, 2007 9:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby fin farm » Fri Jul 06, 2007 8:47 am

thanks for sharing :)
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Postby "Umm, fish?" » Fri Jul 06, 2007 10:01 am

Kathy-- You didn't type that, did you? :shock:

Thanks!
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Re:

Postby Dman » Fri Jul 06, 2007 10:42 am

"Umm, fish?" wrote:Kathy-- You didn't type that, did you? :shock:

Thanks!


Unless she has a really, really good version of dragon-speak, she would have been up until almost 4am typing it.

Kathy,
Did I forget to mention that his hobby is a major inductor of insomnia.
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Postby KathyL » Fri Jul 06, 2007 10:57 am

It only took me about an hour to type and edit the misstyped stuff.

Then i fell asleep and I am quite groggy this morning. I hope to get to scanning this evening. Perhaps I'll have something better tonight.

Derek, do you want the originals back?
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Re:

Postby KathyL » Fri Jul 06, 2007 10:59 am

Dman wrote:...Kathy,
Did I forget to mention that his hobby is a major inductor of insomnia.


You did forget, but its OK. That's what happens when you are sleep deprived...:)
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Re:

Postby Dman » Fri Jul 06, 2007 11:07 am

KathyL wrote:
Derek, do you want the originals back?


Are you implying they're not in capable hands? :P
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Postby KathyL » Fri Jul 06, 2007 12:19 pm

I am wearing clean white cotton gloves and handling them minimally. Just want to know if you want these rare items for your personal collection.:)
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Postby Luis A M » Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:17 pm

What alternatives to hand typing do we have?.Scanning,attaching,pasting,pdf ing?
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Postby The Ediaz » Fri Jul 27, 2007 11:58 am

I will retire today, i going to call Jonh @ reefball foundation and get a cut of the whatever he gets when he sues K...

I have this link:

http://www.recif-france.com/SeaScope1-15.php

it has lots of the old very good ones but is in french, theres nothing online for the english versions, Sea scope should have copies but the person in charge is very busy and requesting them has no results.

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Postby Luis A M » Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:14 pm

Good link,Ed!Como estas,tanto tiempo?
There is an English option there.I enjoyed re-reading some good old articles.There is one by Witt on lionfish,Jackie B on comets,and Todd G on raising gobies with ciliates,one of the very few references on them.Worth browsing! :D
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Postby The Ediaz » Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:48 pm

Bien hermano , bien

si se ve el de Jackie y Todd en ingles?

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Postby Luis A M » Fri Jul 27, 2007 5:02 pm

Sure, you have just to click "english version".
I don´t think I recall the art.on comets.So they are hard to spawn but then they have big,easy larvae?
Tambien compraste el libro de Witt?
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Postby DrHsu » Fri Jul 27, 2007 11:17 pm

I've downloaded it all to pdf. Any one wants one just let me know.:wink:

The whole 1998 to 2005 is too huge to ever send I think (around 32 mb) but I can probably extract issues out.
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Postby William » Sat Jul 28, 2007 11:47 am

Li Chieh sent me the entire PDF.

You can download it here.
Seascope 1998 - 2005
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Postby The Ediaz » Mon Jul 30, 2007 12:26 pm

Yes Luis, the larvae is easier than occelaris they just grow...

Si lo compre en walmart LOL, a proposito de comets, la foto en la contraportada de el comet fue criado por Todd, Jackie y yo, la foto la tomo Michael cuando fue con Wilkerson a tomar fotos para su libro por eso algunas se repiten en Witt's.

Buen libro, mucha informacion, aunque no podrias crian las especies no payasos solo con este libro tiene muchisima valiosa informacion.

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