New Frank B. article in "Coral"

New Frank B. article in "Coral"

Postby Luis A M » Thu Mar 22, 2012 4:30 pm

Again Frank authors an anthological article,this time in the last (Mar-Apr.) issue of "Coral".He discusses larviculture details for rearing a trigger species,and succeeds by using an oligotrich ciliate,Strombidium,as first food. 8)
Worth reading article!.We could comment it here. :wink:
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Re: New Frank B. article in "Coral"

Postby Luis A M » Fri Mar 23, 2012 4:21 pm

If nobody is game,I could start. :)
Everytime we face complete failure working with a specific larva,we try to blame the lack of the right first food organism,the "silver bullet"that would make it happen.I was skeptical about that and thought that environmental factors (culture protocols) can many times define success or failure.
Especially after Frank´s success with angels,it was easy to suspect that allpelagic larvae (with few exceptions,like leptocephali) start feeding on copepod nauplii,their natural food.If so,there was no secret organism to find,only to improve our larviculture techniques,or perhaps relying more in wild plankton,which could bring some unknown factors cultured copepods might lack.
But there are some weak points in this position:
The size of the smallest free copepod naup.,Parvocalanus,still looks big for the smaller first feeding larvae.
And big organizations keep failing absolutely in the rearing attempts of some species,like Yellow Tangs.
This strongly suggests a first food missing.
Now Frank says in this article,that he could not have the trigger larvae survive after yolk sac absorption,using the same protocol he uses with Centropyge.He went to the extreme of raising together angel and trigger larvae in co-culture,and the angels thrived while the triggers died.
He tried several planktonic ciliates and he could at last find one,Strombidium,that could be easily cultured and made it happen;triggers could be raised with them.
So this shows clearly that indeed there are unknown first food "silver bullets" needed to raise small larvae,like Strombidium.Perhaps this ciliate could work for many of our current "impossible"species. I can´t stop dreaming that someday soon,Strombidium will be available to us.
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Re: New Frank B. article in "Coral"

Postby altolamprologus » Fri Mar 23, 2012 9:59 pm

I was very intrigued by the findings in that article. It's pretty encouraging to see that the trouble raising so many species is simply the lack of a first food item, which has now been found. If the Strombidium sp. cultures grow as fast as he says they do, I could see starter cultures entering the market within the next couple years. It would be nice to walk into stores and find captive bred tangs one day :)
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Re: New Frank B. article in "Coral"

Postby Luis A M » Sat Mar 24, 2012 12:51 am

Yes,and it is funny to see that Frank always prefered wild plankton,he didn´t culture copepods.But now he was forced to culture because ciliates are not easy to collect in massive quantities.So he found that Strombidium was easy to culture.
Which is good news for us breeders far from tropical seas! 8)
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Re: New Frank B. article in "Coral"

Postby EasterEggs » Sat Mar 24, 2012 3:18 pm

I don't have my CORAL mag yet...
Given sufficient thrust, pigs will fly just fine.
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